Rates Table

The statutory rates and compensation limits

Current Rate

New Rate

Effective From

National Living Wage (NLW) – Workers aged 25 and over.

£7.50

£7.83

1/04/18

NMW - Standard (adult) rate (workers ages 21 years and over)

£7.05

 £7.38

 1/04/18

NMW - Development rate (workers aged between 18-20)

£5.60

£5.90

1/04/18

NMW - Young workers right (workers aged under 18 but above the compulsory school age who are not apprentices)

£4.05

£4.20

1/04/18

NMW - Apprentices (under 19 years old or those aged 19 and over but in the first year of their apprenticeship)

£3.50

£3.70

1/04/18

Guarantee Pay

£26.00

£27.00

6/04/17

The limit on the amount of a week’s pay for the purposes of calculating, among other things, statutory redundancy payments and the basic award for unfair dismissal

£489.00

£TBA

6/04/17

The maximum compensatory award for unfair dismissal

£80,541

£TBA

6/04/17

The minimum basic award in cases where the dismissal was unfair by virtue of health and safety, employee representative, trade union, or occupational pension trustee reasons

£5,970

£TBA

6/04/17

Statutory Maternity, Paternity, Additional Paternity, Adoption Pay and Maternity Allowance

£140.98

£145.18

1/04/17

Statutory Shared Parental Pay

£140.98

£145.18

1/04/17

Statutory Sick Pay

£89.35

£90.05

1/04/17

LATEST LEGAL UPDATES:

  • Update on ‘Gig Economy’ Case Law and Developments

    Tags: Employment Status, Gig economy, Temporary Positions, Freelance work, Short-term, Tribunal Cases, Statutory Employment Rights

    Welcome to the new modern work structure: the gig economy. Where temporary positions are prevalent, freelance work is the norm and organisations contract with individuals on a short-term basis. In this article we will explore the high-profile tribunal cases of 2017 which have kept the ‘gig economy’ making headline news. 

    Aslam and others v Uber BV and others 

    The tribunal found that the drivers were not ‘self-employed’ but ‘workers’. Uber presented its business as a technology platform which facilitates the connection of self-employed drivers with customers through the Uber app. On the facts, the tribunal disagreed with this and found that this did not reflect the practical reality. In the tribunal’s view, the drivers were working … more

    

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