Archives

Archives / 2012 / September
  • Are ‘without prejudice’ conversations safe?

    Tags: Without Prejudice, Compromise Agreement, Employment Law, Employment Tribunals, Unfair Dismissal, Discrimination, Disability Discrimination

     

    Employer-employee relationships can become strained due to a number of different factors and sometimes both parties wish to amicably part ways and embark on what they term as ‘off the record’ or ‘without prejudice’ conversations with a view to entering into a compromise agreement. The Question is; if no agreement is reached can the content of those conversations be admissible in the employment tribunal?

    Gallop –v- Newport City Councilis a recent Employment Appeal Tribunal (EAT) decision which looked at the issue of admissibility of ‘without prejudice’ conversations. Mr Gallop was employed by the Newport City Council as a training officer. He claimed to be suffering from depression which has been brought about as a result of work related … more

  • Further plans by the Government to provide businesses more flexibility through changing employment laws

    Tags: Settlement Agreements, Compromise Agreements, Unfair Dismissall, Compensation, TUPE, Disciplinary process, Grievance process, Employment Law, Employment Law Reforms

    I know it may only seem as though it was yesterday that I was informing everyone on the consultation about the employment tribunal but I can assure you that it was last month! So I thought for those of you who are following the reforms I would provide you with a short summary of the proposal by Business Secretary Vince Cable on 14 September. He announced further steps to reduce employment law in his vision to give business owners/managers more flexibility in managing their workforce.

    The package put forward on the 14 September 2012 came from the response from businesses to speed up the process for ending an employment relationship (for both employer and employee) when it breaks down (if you have not been following the employment law reforms you may find it useful to read the following … more

  • New BIS scheme to enforce National Minimum Wage (NMW) by naming and shaming employers

    Tags: National Minimum Wage, BIS, Employment Law

    You may have all heard about the BIS scheme which was launched on 1 January 2011 and set out to name employers who failed to pay their employees the NMW. Well now Norman Lamb, Minister for Employment Relations, has named the first employer – Rita Patel. The Leicester hair and beauty salon owner has been named for failing to pay £3,361.22 to former worker following an investigation by HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC).

    HMRC have resorted to enforcing the debt through the courts. The Government argues (and I have to agree it is certainly arguable) that bad publicity is an effective way of deterring employers who may be tempted to pay their workers less than the NMW.

    Currently HMRC issue a press release when an employer has unsuccessfully appealed against a notice of underpayment … more

Archive

Subscribe to our mailing list and receive monthly updates of the articles that we publish.

* indicates required

LATEST LEGAL UPDATES:

  • LEGAL UPDATE: Payslips

    Tags: Payslips, Employment Rights Act 1996

    Issuing payslips is normally a routine process and you may not give a lot of thought to the legislation behind it.  In fact, the law imposes strict obligations on employers regarding what must be displayed in the payslip.

    What right does the law provide?

    The law states that an employee has the right to a written itemised payslip by their employer on or before pay day.

    Do I need to give it to everyone at my organisation?

    This right is provided to all employees. It does not extend to workers, contractors or freelancers.

    What should it include?

    The payslip, which can be provided electronically or in printed form, must include the following information:

    • the gross amount of wages or salary;

    • the amounts of any variable and any relevant fixed deductions and the … more

    

Reviews and Ratings for solicitor Samira Cakali, Leeds