Contents tagged with Statutory Maternity Pay

  • Advice for Employers on Accommodating Parents with Premature or Sick Babies

    Tags: Maternity Leave, Maternity Rights, Maternity Pay, Statutory Maternity Pay, Premature or Sick Babies, MAT B1, Maternity Allowance

    Every year, over 95,000 babies (or 1 in 8 babies born) are cared for in neonatal units in the UK due to premature birth or sickness. While some pregnancies inherently pose a higher risk for premature birth, such as twins and multiples, there is no guarantee a mother will be able to carry to-term.  

    Depending on how premature or sick the babies may be at birth, parents might find that their babies have to stay weeks or months in hospital, and some of these babies may continue to be at risk even after being discharged. In some cases, the babies may be transferred to a different or specialist hospital if the treatment or care they require is not available in the area in which they are born.  

    Maternity Leave: 

    Doctors and midwives must issue the pregnant … more

  • The Processes and Pitfalls of Dealing with Staff who are Taking Maternity Leave

    Tags: Redundancy, Maternity Leave, Statutory Maternity Pay, Keeping in Touch, Pregnancy

    With Samira on Maternity Leave from the end of today, we thought it was only fitting that our article this week covered this complex area of law. Family friendly rights, including leave and pay in relation to maternity are constantly evolving and growing as an area of employment law. In this article we aim to offer some clarity on this area and provide employers with some advice on the do’s and don’ts when dealing with staff taking maternity leave.  

    Processes  

    Ensure that you keep in touch with employees whilst they are away on maternity leave. 

    Line managers should agree with employees that are due to go off on maternity what “reasonable contact” would be appropriate before their leave starts. Once agreed, you can use this time … more

  • LEGAL UPDATE: Changes to Statutory Payments

    Tags: statutory payments, Statutory Maternity Pay, Statutory Paternity Pay, Statutory Shared Parental Pay, Statutory Adoption Pay, SAP, Statutory Sick Pay, SSP, National Living Wage, NLW

    As we are approaching another tax year, the Department for Work and Pensions (“DWP”) has announced proposed revised amounts for various statutory payments from 1 April 2018. 

    Statutory Maternity Pay/Statutory Paternity Pay/Statutory Shared Parental Pay

     These are all currently £140.98 (or 90% of the employee’s average weekly earnings if this figure is less than the statutory rate). The weekly rate will increase to £145.18 with effect 1 April 2018. 

    To qualify, the employee must have average weekly earnings of at least:

    • £116, if the baby is due on or after 15 July 2018. 

    • £113, if the baby is due on or before 14 July 2018. 

    Statutory Adoption Pay (SAP)

    The weekly rate increases so that it is payable at … more

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LATEST LEGAL UPDATES:

  • Gig Economy – Royal Mail Group Facing legal action from drivers

    Tags: National Minimum Wage, Employment Tribunal, Employment Appeal Tribunal, Gig Economy, Worker, Supreme Court, Self-Employed, Royal Mail, Drivers, DPD

    The trend towards gig economy drivers and contractors demanding employment status rights will continue throughout 2018. This should come as no surprise when you consider the recent report published by parliamentary committees which determined nearly 1.6 million people work for gig-economy giants and find relatively little protection provided under current employment law due to their status. 

    We previously reported on the Uber drivers ongoing battle in August 2016, and the EAT decision in November 2017 if you haven’t been keeping up with our gig economy posts. 

    More recently, in December 2017, couriers at Parcelforce Worldwide commenced legal action against its parent group, Royal Mail Group Ltd, over failure to pay drivers the national minimum wage and holiday pay.& … more

    

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