Contents tagged with Maternity Pay

  • Advice for Employers on Accommodating Parents with Premature or Sick Babies

    Tags: Maternity Leave, Maternity Rights, Maternity Pay, Statutory Maternity Pay, Premature or Sick Babies, MAT B1, Maternity Allowance

    Every year, over 95,000 babies (or 1 in 8 babies born) are cared for in neonatal units in the UK due to premature birth or sickness. While some pregnancies inherently pose a higher risk for premature birth, such as twins and multiples, there is no guarantee a mother will be able to carry to-term.  

    Depending on how premature or sick the babies may be at birth, parents might find that their babies have to stay weeks or months in hospital, and some of these babies may continue to be at risk even after being discharged. In some cases, the babies may be transferred to a different or specialist hospital if the treatment or care they require is not available in the area in which they are born.  

    Maternity Leave: 

    Doctors and midwives must issue the pregnant … more

  • The April spring clean

    Tags: Employment Law, Employment Rights, Collective Redundancy Consultation, Statutory Sick Pay, Maternity Pay, Paternity Pay, Statutory Adoption Pay, Discrimination. Injury to Feelings, Employee-Owner Schemes

    Once again it is April and with this comes the employment law equivalent of ‘spring cleaning’. The April 2013 ‘spring clean’ brings about the following changes:  

    Collective Redundancy Consultation Period Reduction

    Perhaps the most important change affects the procedure for an employer looking to make 100 or more employees redundant at one establishment within 90 days. Currently the consultation period for this type of mass redundancy is 90 days, meaning that however likely redundancies ultimately were, employees would still be employed for at least this period while the consultation took place. 

    The net result of this was a higher cost to the struggling employer. From 6 April 2013, the compulsory consultation period is halved to 45 days.

    Further, … more

  • Statutory Maternity Pay (SMP)– what are the rules?

    Tags: Maternity Leave, Employment Law, Maternity Pay, SMP, Continuous Employment

    I think everyone gets confused about maternity and entitlements. So I thought a quick guide to help everyone understand their rights would be useful. Whether you are an employer or employee if after reading this guidance note you are still confused then please do make contact and I will try and place you on the correct path.Who is entitled to SMP?Employees qualify for SMP if they satisfy the:(1) The continuous employment rule:- This means an employee must be employed by the same employer continuously for at least 26 weeks into the 15th week before the week the baby is due (the qualifying week).

    - Exceptions can be made if the baby is born premature.When can a break amount to being continuous employment? When an employee:- Is absent (for periods of 26 consecutive weeks or less) because … more

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  • Understanding Your Legal Rights When an Employee Leaves

    Tags: Notice, Garden Leave, Payment, Company Property, Training Costs, Restrictive Covenants, Exit, Resignation, Employer, Employee, Employment Law, UKEmpLaw

    When an employee leaves, the focus is often on their entitlements. But what are your rights as an employer and what practical steps can you take to ensure a smooth exit? 

    Giving Notice 

    When it comes to employees giving notice, there are several key areas to note. Employers do not have to ‘accept’ a resignation – it is a unilateral act. Equally, they do not have to accept a retraction of notice, unless it was given in the heat of the moment, or the employee was unwell.

    Employees must give at least a weeks’ notice once they have been employed for more than a month. However, longer notice is usually set out in the employment contract.

    If the employee starts work for someone else in their notice period, it is possible to obtain an injunction to prevent … more

    

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